Archive for the ‘Control Processor’ Category

On the course do you address the issues that occur in digital control teams between software engineers and power electronics hardware engineers

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2016

How do hardware and software engineers talk to each other?

This is the extract from a recent conversation on LinkedIn between power electronics engineers of all different flavors.  It sums up beautifully the issues between hardware and software engineers in digital power electronics control developments. (Names shortened to protect the innocent.)

D. H.

‘Y. & A., I have no idea what half of the acronyms are which you (software) guys are using but, I get the feeling from A.  that optimized C (whatever that is) is slower for a multiplication than assembly. Y. seems to be saying that a particular version of C he likes creates a faster multiplication.
So, I’m just left confused. Which is it?
I’m from the 80’s. This is when a multiply was a simple, understandable add-shift, add-shift,….repeat 8 times and you’re done. Many modern processors have one command – MUL AxB. Nowadays, digital guys are telling me that this method is so complicated. Why? Why is a simple multiply so complicated now when 30 yrs ago it was routine and easy to understand?’

Hamish from ELMG Digital Power

‘D. H. – there is a really big disconnect between the software able guys like Y. and the non software able guys ( I am guessing you – sorry if I am wrong). It is often that sort of cultural mis-alignment that causes lots of issues in the development. We fix the cultural alignment for companies sometimes. And its a process and there isn’t really an easy road and, I hate to say it, some teams go under doing it. We created our digital training course as the result of a customer R and D manager asking us when we were in the middle of a fix up “How could we have avoided this?” ‘

D. H.

‘Hamish, You’re right about the cultural mismatch. (Yes, I’m not a software guy). My post a few days back concerned a software guy who had trouble communicating to me why his code was lengthy and complex, and I had trouble communicating with him as to why my view of a simple look-up table isn’t valid anymore. Maybe D. E. was correct, a “good” programmer should know how to deal with math.
Are these type of issues going to be addressed in your course?’

Hamish 

‘D. H. – In short yes. The slightly longer answer is. In the course we cover this culture issue both explicitly and implicitly. Team culture structure and organisation for digital power controllers are really important to success. And even more critical to sustained success when the “fix up” consultant has left the building. How we address this group culture issue in the course is by showing the attendees how to setup the conversation and documents so that the different types of people all can understand and contribute. Understanding and empathizing with the software engineers ethos, and what he values, is key to the power electronics converter engineer being able to do her job. And likewise. Engineers are technical people – which often speaks for itself in team dynamics. In the course we cover how matching the system partition to the team partition and to the system documents gives you a really good shot at success.’

Y.

‘D. H.  , It is a known problem where software get hard time from hardware and vice versa ,many project fell because of this issue
I solved this problem long time ago when I decided to learn software (computer science ) after a good career as a hardware designer and since then all the hardware and software issue solve internally :-)’

Hamish from ELMG Digital Power

‘Y. is right that you can just learn it all; hardware, software and control. The problem comes when you leave the job and the team have to do it without you. Super engineers are great until they leave the team. And not every company can employ one and most companies prefer a team to manage this risk.’

Come to the course in Camarillo, California,  August 22 through 24 and we’ll show you a good approach to dealing with this cultural mismatch.

Register here

 

APEC Presentation Slide Correction for b1 Coefficient

Wednesday, July 20th, 2016

At APEC this year we presented High Performance Digital Control of Power Electronics.  We then made the slides available and repeated the presentation as two webinars.

Click here to download the slides if you do not have them already  http://info.elmgdigitalpower.com/high-performance-digital-control-presentation

Thanks

Thanks to some good attention by a person who worked through the controller example,  we have noticed an error in one of the coefficients on the slide as shown below.

The correct value for the b1 coefficient is 0.00625.

Thanks to the helpful person who found this.

APEC Presentation slide correction for b1 coefficient

APEC Presentation slide correction for b1 coefficient

 

 

 

 

 

Control Scope Integrated into Digital Power Controller

Friday, July 8th, 2016

How can I look at my digital signals in my power controller?

One of the big issues when working on digital control of power electronics is being able to look at the digital signals inside your controller.  In order to see what is going on inside the control the digital signals need to be brought out so you can look at them.

When a DAC isn’t good enough.

One way to do this is with a digital to analog converter (DAC) where the digital stream is sent out as an analogue signal.  These DAC channels are really useful and should be on every digital power electronics controller.  However processing power usually limits the logging or data streaming to a DAC to a low number of channels.  Each channel requires a scope channel of its own to do measurement.  Any measurement is limited in length to the scope’s memory and the scopes sample rate.

scope-capture

ELMG Digital Power ControlScope

Data Collection in the Controller and Detecting Events

There is also the issue that collecting enough data to allow event detection such as;

  • single sample errors
  • clipping
  • overflow
  • underflow or precision loss and
  • bursty instability due to precision loss

can be a very difficult large load on the control processor and memory if the data logging rate is very high or if the rate of the problem is very low.

Control Scope Integrated into Digital Power Controller

To solve this problem we put the data collection and logging into the controller but without loading the controller.

Using the Xlinx Zynq system on a chip (SoC) we use the flexibility of running Linux on one of the two ARM 9 cores to provide the high speed gigabit Ethernet connectivity.

Dlog Implementation

Dlog Implementation

We also use the Linux for secure remote access if required.

Using ELMG Power Core IP blocks and know how we create firmware in the FPGA fabric of the Zynq.  This connects to the Linux kernel and then the Linux user space.  Data can be logged at full sample rates into SD cards or MMX memory and simultaneously out via the Gigabit Ethernet to the internet.

To be very clear no Linux code is included in the power electronics control function which is all implemented in the FPGA fabric on the Zynq.

Put a scope on the other end of the Ethernet

The video shows the ELMG ControlScope application connected to the ELMG Digital Power Zynq data collection system (named Dlog).

This system implements a fully functional oscilloscope that allows the internal operation of the digital control to be shown and logged.

With gigabit Ethernet logging rates of 25 M bytes per second are possible using Dlog.

This means that logging of your power converter performance and waveforms, scope function or debugging can be done over the internet.

To evaluate the Dlog and the ControlScope than click below.  


Request Dlog and ControlScope Information



Congratulations to Dr. Rabia Nazir on completing her PhD in fractional delays in repetitive control

Friday, December 18th, 2015

Over the last two years ELMG Digital Power CTO, Dr. Hamish Laird, has helped supervise (the now Dr.) Rabia Nazir in the pursuit of her Doctoral studies.

Hamish Laird says

“The research that Rabia has completed in the area of fractional delays in recursive filters for current control in grid tied inverters gives great control tools in the implementation of control for GTIs in grids where the AC system frequency is varying. It is always great to help with PhD research as I learn so much so thanks to Rabia for letting me help.”

Congratulations to Dr. Rabia Nazir on her successful oral defense of here work.  Dr Laird again

“It was fantastic to attend Rabia’s defense.  I am so proud of and pleased with the work she did in analysing, simulating and building power converter hardware to show her findings. It was a great learning experience for me.”

Recently (now Dr.) Rabia Nazir presented a paper at a conference in Sicily on the use of Taylor Series expansion based fractional delay filters for recursive control of grid inverter currents.

Contact us for a copy of the paper.

 

 

Migration from MCU/DSP to FPGA for Power Electronics: Part 1 Software

Tuesday, November 17th, 2015

In a recent discussion we were asked about the migration path from MCU/DSP to FPGA.

“I am probably not alone when I use MCU/DSP devices to implement control algorithms, protection, logic etc to control the power hardware, using code such as ASM, C or C++, but want the advantages of FPGA. What suggestions do you have to start this migration, both in terms of a cheap evaluation board, and software tools, that can be targeted at driving various topologies and speeds.”

Thanks to Anthony W. for the question.  We get asked similar migration from MCU/DSP to FPGA for power electronics questions where the emphasis is more about retaining the value of an existing code base and coding team expertise while leveraging the flexibility of the FPGA.

As the first question states MCU/DSP devices are a common tool to implement control algorithms, protection, logic and sequencing for  control power hardware, using code such as ASM, C or C++.  However they do not have the power and flexibility of FPGAs. What is the best way to approach a migration from MCU/DSP to FPGA, both in terms of evaluation boards, and software tools, for a wide range of power electronic applications?

Best migration path MCU/DSP to FPGA for Power Electronics

There are a number of pathways to do this. The first one is High Level Synthesis. This is basically writing FPGA code in C. It is a very powerful tool but it does take some know how to make sure that you can get the most benefit out of the transition to FPGA. The downside of this is that it is quite expensive. There are however a couple of FPGA kits out there that do come with a kit-locked license (node-locked and locked to the FPGA model on the board).

Processor Inside

Another way is to use an FPGA with a processor, or processors, inside it. These processor can be soft-cores like Xilinx’s Microblaze or hard-cores like the twin ARM A9s in Xilinx’s Zynq series. (Reports on FPGA development projects show that almost 50% have some sort of processor.)  This processor allows you to directly port your code from your MCU/DSP to the Zynq/Microblaze and be ready to go. This may seem counter-productive as going from one processor to another without really gaining FPGA power is work for no reward.  The advantages come when you move parts of your code (the high intensity tasks such as the control algorithms) from C to the FPGA hardware. This provides a power boost for the important parts of your code whilst still having the simplicity of C for the easy flow of your code. A good analogy would be that the FPGA parts are the equivalent of the ASM parts on the MCU/DSP but with the superman type speed advantage of doing things in parallel in the FPGA fabric.

Best of both

Xilinx has also combined the HLS and the C coding options with their SDSoC product. It is designed for the Zynq SoC .  The coding is done in C. However you can use HLS to accelerate certain parts of the code for you to gain the most benefit.

Getting the most out of the Zynq solution does require either the expensive HLS toolchain and training in that or writing your own HDL. Another option is to purchase IP that other companies have written.  This allows you to create a fast and efficient system without needing to know coding of an FPGA in HDL or C.  ELMG Digital Power has a large suite of power electronics IP to get your application off the ground fast.

Prototyping and Development Platforms

In part 2 of this blog post, which is coming later, the answers to the questions

“How can I prototype this when the chip is BGA only?”

and

“What is an appropriate development platform or dev board?”

are covered.

Download the report ‘Your Digital Power Future – Roadblocks to Avoid’ to learn about the three key issues to watch out for in the Digital Control of Power electronics.


Download report now

Safety Critical Digital Control – Planes in Fog

Wednesday, December 24th, 2014

Safety critical digital control for airplanes in fog

This article was originally published in 2010.  It is part of the ELMG redux series of articles that will be republished over the summer.  These articles cover subjects in and around digital control of power electronics.

Redux – Safety Critical Digital Control – Planes in Fog

Just before Christmas 2006 I spent sometime (24 hours) in Copenhagen Airport as I waited for my plane after doing a week of meetings in Southern Sweden. I very nearly had a forced stopover in London at Heathrow as London fog shut that airport.  This stranded almost eighty thousand people who could not go on their holidays.

My connecting flight into Heathrow was cancelled due to that very fog in London. As a result I did not ever get to London and so I missed my connection out of London. Luckily for me I was re-routed the next day directly through Hong Kong missing the crowds of delayed passengers at Heathrow.  Thanks to all those that helped me.

Copenhagen Airport

As I waited at Copenhagen I thought about a number of things

  1. The large numbers of people at Heathrow and how their holidays would go? My sympathy to all the people who were delayed in Europe at or around Christmas time.
  2. Why, if an airliner can land itself at LAX in perfectly good weather, can an airliner not land itself in London in the fog? The pilot on my last flight to LA informed the passengers that the plane we were on would land itself at LAX. I cannot verify whether the plane did or did not land itself but we did get down safely.
  3.  What would my pre-school age daughter say if I did not get home for Christmas?

So if the plane can land on a sunny day in LAX why can it not land in the fog at London?

The guidance system on an airliner is an safety critical digital control system. It takes inputs from various guidance sensors (like GPS and inertial guidance) and produces outputs for the control surfaces like the elevators and ailerons. As such it will be a mixture of hardware and firmware  software. The program code is most probably written in a safety critical digital control useful language (not C) such as ADA. The method to write the software is (hopefully) well defined and the code is well inspected and walked through. The guidance system is then certified along with the aircraft by the FAA and other suitable safety authorities.

A Sunny Day in LA.

So let me say that again – on a good sunny day in LA my pilot can let the machine land itself but in London my plane cannot land because of the fog. I thought about why this was and even asked a friend. He said that it was “All because of the labour unions” which I hadn’t even considered. I decided that it may well be something else. Labour unions may have something to do with it but I don’t have time to write about that.

Critical Failure Modes Analysis

Consider the failure mode of the plane landing in Heathrow in the fog. If something goes wrong with the part of the guidance/landing system that takes care of height, then the airliner hits hard into the runway and makes a mess. Consider the same failure mode in the good weather at LAX. The plane is at the wrong height and would dive into the runway. Instead the over riding backup system looks out the window and takes control of the plane.

Safety Critical Digital Control on a plane needs a Pilot

So here is the skinny – it is OK for the plane to land itself so long as the backup override system is working. This backup is the pilot and so long as she isn’t struck down by food poisoning and she can see the runway she will not let the plane crash.

I am glad my flight to London was cancelled.

There have been incidents where the pilot has attempted to stop the plane crashing but the embedded systems in the plane have refused to help out. That, though, is something for another time.

Since this article was written safety of airliners and their safety critical digital control systems has come into sharp focus. Apologies and condolences to all and everyone who have been touched by the failings of digital control systems in the airline industry.