Archive for the ‘Training’ Category

Free Webinar December 22 Digital Power Electronics Control

Thursday, December 15th, 2016

Thursday December 22 at 11am California time (2pm Eastern) ELMG Digital Power are offering you the opportunity to learn about the Digital Power Electronics Control.

Digital Power Electronics Control

Join ELMG Digital Power’s regular Digital Power Webinar and expand your knowledge and expertise by discovering:

  • What is important in digital power, including numeric precision and latency
  • How to design a compensator in the digital domain

Presenter

The webinar will be hosted and presented by Dr. Hamish Laird.  Hamish is  ELMG Digital Power’s CTO.  He also presents and teaches the Digital Control of Power Electronics course. Hamish has twenty five years of experience the design and implementation of varied digital control systems and IP for power electronics.

Dr. Hamish Laird at the ELMG Camarillo Office

Dr. Hamish Laird presenting the August 2016 Training course

Free

This exciting opportunity is free and includes a thirty minute Q&A session with Dr. Hamish.

The webinar is Thursday December 22 at 11am California time (2pm Eastern).

http://info.elmgdigitalpower.com/digital_power_dec2016

 

On the course do you address the issues that occur in digital control teams between software engineers and power electronics hardware engineers

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2016

How do hardware and software engineers talk to each other?

This is the extract from a recent conversation on LinkedIn between power electronics engineers of all different flavors.  It sums up beautifully the issues between hardware and software engineers in digital power electronics control developments. (Names shortened to protect the innocent.)

D. H.

‘Y. & A., I have no idea what half of the acronyms are which you (software) guys are using but, I get the feeling from A.  that optimized C (whatever that is) is slower for a multiplication than assembly. Y. seems to be saying that a particular version of C he likes creates a faster multiplication.
So, I’m just left confused. Which is it?
I’m from the 80’s. This is when a multiply was a simple, understandable add-shift, add-shift,….repeat 8 times and you’re done. Many modern processors have one command – MUL AxB. Nowadays, digital guys are telling me that this method is so complicated. Why? Why is a simple multiply so complicated now when 30 yrs ago it was routine and easy to understand?’

Hamish from ELMG Digital Power

‘D. H. – there is a really big disconnect between the software able guys like Y. and the non software able guys ( I am guessing you – sorry if I am wrong). It is often that sort of cultural mis-alignment that causes lots of issues in the development. We fix the cultural alignment for companies sometimes. And its a process and there isn’t really an easy road and, I hate to say it, some teams go under doing it. We created our digital training course as the result of a customer R and D manager asking us when we were in the middle of a fix up “How could we have avoided this?” ‘

D. H.

‘Hamish, You’re right about the cultural mismatch. (Yes, I’m not a software guy). My post a few days back concerned a software guy who had trouble communicating to me why his code was lengthy and complex, and I had trouble communicating with him as to why my view of a simple look-up table isn’t valid anymore. Maybe D. E. was correct, a “good” programmer should know how to deal with math.
Are these type of issues going to be addressed in your course?’

Hamish 

‘D. H. – In short yes. The slightly longer answer is. In the course we cover this culture issue both explicitly and implicitly. Team culture structure and organisation for digital power controllers are really important to success. And even more critical to sustained success when the “fix up” consultant has left the building. How we address this group culture issue in the course is by showing the attendees how to setup the conversation and documents so that the different types of people all can understand and contribute. Understanding and empathizing with the software engineers ethos, and what he values, is key to the power electronics converter engineer being able to do her job. And likewise. Engineers are technical people – which often speaks for itself in team dynamics. In the course we cover how matching the system partition to the team partition and to the system documents gives you a really good shot at success.’

Y.

‘D. H.  , It is a known problem where software get hard time from hardware and vice versa ,many project fell because of this issue
I solved this problem long time ago when I decided to learn software (computer science ) after a good career as a hardware designer and since then all the hardware and software issue solve internally :-)’

Hamish from ELMG Digital Power

‘Y. is right that you can just learn it all; hardware, software and control. The problem comes when you leave the job and the team have to do it without you. Super engineers are great until they leave the team. And not every company can employ one and most companies prefer a team to manage this risk.’

Come to the course in Camarillo, California,  August 22 through 24 and we’ll show you a good approach to dealing with this cultural mismatch.

Register here

 

Three Day Digital Control Course August 22-24 California

Friday, July 22nd, 2016

The ELMG Digital Power Electronics Control Course

Three days of focused unique training in digital control of power electronics!

Our Digital Power Electronics Control Course overs the essential knowledge and know-how for engineers to implement digital power electronic control!

Come to the Three Day Digital Control Course in Camarillo, California August 22-24, 2016.  Register here.

How did the course came about?

Essentially the course came about because we were asked by one of our customer’s to provide one. The story is we were in the middle of a “fix up” job where the power supply had shown some control instability at its final release testing. The testing that showed the problem was passing a short circuit test of parallel connected power supplies. When the short circuit was removed the supplies came out of current limit, however they did not come out of the limit at exactly the same time. This created an oscillation where individual power supplies came out of current limit and then returned to current limit.  It was possible for the oscillation to continue indefinitely.  This was an unacceptable and embarrassing problem.

Six months of expertise in a three day course

During the six month project to rework the control code we spent lots of time teaching the team about the underlying issues that had been missed when the controller had been designed, coded and tested.  And part way through the “fix-up” the R and D manager suggested we could put a course together covering all that the team needed to know.

And so the digital control course was born

The first course covered exactly what we had discovered during the fix up job.  This included lots of digital expertise targeted for power electronics.  The areas we covered were diverse from;

  • Numeric precision loss in filters
  • Improvement of modulation spectral performance
  • Stability
  • The effect of numeric precision on stability
  • Best filter forms
  • Direct digital control design
  • Linearising control loops

What is covered in our course?

The course was created at the request of a Power Electronics Research  and Development manager.  He asked that we make it specific his team’s needs.  And this is why the course has the unique structure that it has.  We have been through the pain and heartbreak of having digital control development go wrong and have seen clearly where the repeated problems lie; our course addresses those areas.

Digital PWM and VPO modulators

One of the big differences between digital power electronics control and conventional analog control is the timer precision in digital modulators. This difference can be corrected or made negligible and in some cases can be made an advantage.  Spectral control in digital modulators is a focus area in the course as it is so effective.

Digital Precision in control blocks

It is possible to use a digital system and adjust the coefficients of the filters so that small inputs result in no output from the filter. Such scaling issues often lead to a loss of precision in the digital control system. The resulting slip-strike behavior can create limit cycle oscillations in the power converter output.

Direct Digital design of controllers

The “design then translation” approach of taking analog controllers to digital form can be avoided by using the direct digital design approach. This simple but powerful method of digital control loop design is covered in the course.

Converter non-linearity correction

Certain converter topologies are non-linear either in the control input to the output or the conversion ration.  Dealing with the converter non-linearity to achieve high bandwidth is key to stable parallel connected converters.

Stability

The course covers the fundamentals of stability from a physical basis with a focus on measurements of power converter transfers.  This along with a simple framework for managing margins and robustness is an integral part of the course.

Why we offer the course?

Understanding and implementing digital control of power electronics offers great advantages for configuration and flexibility. However, this is not without road blocks and issues that need to be designed around. This course provides the know how to get digital control working robustly and reliably.

How do I get on the course?

The course is next being run in Camarillo, California USA August 22-24.  To register for the course, click and visit the information page here. Press the ‘Register’ button on the page and this will take you to the shopping cart for the course. Complete the purchase to register for the course.

Next course

The next course is being held August 22-24 in Camarillo, California, USA.

Hotels

HOTELS

There are several hotels a short distance from the Ridley Engineering Design Center. The prices below reflect their current prices for August 2016. The last hotel listed is a nice beachfront resort if you do not mind the 25-minute commute to the office. Regardless of your selection, we recommend arriving on Sunday evening and departing Wednesday evening or Thursday.

 

Best Western Inn

295 E Daily Drive, Camarillo

0.3 mi.

805-987-4991

$100/night

Book.western.com

Residence Inn by Marriott

2912 Petit Street, Camarillo

2.8 mi.

805-388-7997

$185/night

Marriott.com

Courtyard by Marriott

4994 Verdugo Way, Camarillo

4.3 mi.

805-388-1020

$180/night

Marriott.com

Hampton Inn & Suites

50 W Daily Drive, Camarillo

1.1   mi.

805-389-9898

$175/night

Hilton.com

Hilton Garden Inn

200 Solar Dr., Oxnard

5.6 mi.

805-983-8600

$155/night

Hilton.com

Embassy Suites Mandalay Beach Resort

2101 Mandalay Beach Rd., Oxnard

15.4 mi.

805-984-2500

$200/night

Hilton.com

Travelling to the course

Transportation

Airports: There are three options for airports. Bob Hope Airport in Burbank will be the least congested and is serviced by American, United, Delta, Southwest and JetBlue:

Bob Hope Airport (BUR)

Los Angeles International Airport (LAX)

Santa Barbara Airport (SBA)

Shuttle: The Roadrunner Shuttle is a Camarillo-based service that provides door-to-door service from the airport. www.rrshuttle.com

Driving:

Bob Hope Burbank Airport (BUR) via US 101

https://goo.gl/maps/caMGB9QSEqP2

Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) via US 101

https://goo.gl/maps/kRBDQifyVfM2

Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) via Pacific Coast Highway (PCH)

https://goo.gl/maps/XPbBhNQYTzj

Santa Barbara Airport (SBA) via US 101

https://goo.gl/maps/2fGP3K7FMZx

About the presenter

3 Day Digital Control Course

Dr. Hamish Laird

Dr. Hamish Laird is a well regarded digital power electronics control engineer, researcher, lecturer and teacher.  Hamish is Chief Technology Officer at ELMG Digital Pwoer and holds a visiting academic position at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand.

During his career Dr Laird has worked on the control for;

  • High Voltage Direct Current Transmission
  • Reactive Power Compensators
  • AC and DC Motor Drives
  • DC to DC converters including LLC and phase shifted bridges
  • Medium and low voltage AC motor starters

Dr. Laird has worked for;

  • Alstom Grid (GEC Alsthom)
  • Eurotherm Drives
  • University of Canterbury
  • Aucom

Through ELMG Digital Power Dr. Laird  has provided advice, services and products to;

  • ABB
  • Enphase
  • Comsys
  • Evashred
  • TNEI
  • Eaton

Dr Laird says

“In designing and presenting the course we aim to have engineers able to use digital control in power electronics to achieve robust and reliable results.  See you in Camarillo”.

 

How to Register

Click here to register.  

P.S. Please note that the ELMG Digital Power course is being hosted at the Ridley Engineering Centre in Camarillo, California.  Ridley Engineering are processing all course registrations viatheir webstore.  Click here to register.  

EMC training 2016

Friday, January 22nd, 2016

Keith Armstrong

Keith Armstrong is coming back to New Zealand and Australia to give EMC and safety training in 2016.

 EMC Training 2016

Keith Armstrong is a well known author and expert in cost-effective EMC and safety management and design. He is a practicing EMC/Compliance engineer and Chairman of IEE/IET Working Group on EMC and Functional Safety. Keith is an articulate and lively presenter and received excellent reviews after his previous visits to New Zealand and Australia. He has an international reputation as an EMC engineer who is constantly seeking to improve EMC practices to save time and cost and improve competitiveness.

He is presenting EMC and Safety courses in Australia and New Zealand.  Course information and dates are available by

About the courses

The great thing about the courses are that they are very practically focused and provide just enough theory.  Keith has great rules of thumb and design guides along with some great reference guides.  I know and like Keith and he teaches well. I have done his courses previously.

This is the course description with dates and locations Keith Armstrong EMC Courses Australia and NZ 2016.

At ELMG Digital Power we use Keith’s courses as the basis for training for EMC. Typically engineers get a training course in their first or second year and then a refresher at or around year five or six.

The courses are a good investment for young and not so young engineers.

If you are not in New Zealand or Australia then please do not worry that you cannot attend.  Keith is based in the United Kingdom and runs similar courses worldwide.

Let us know if you need any further information by clicking here and we will put you in touch directly with Keith.

The training details are available for download here Keith Armstrong EMC Courses Australia and NZ 2016.

 

EMC training

Friday, October 10th, 2014

Keith Armstrong

Keith Armstrong is coming to New Zealand and Australia to give EMC and safety training.

Is EMC for Digital Control different?

EMC is one of the things that needs to be taken care of in power electronics.  Switching can be noisy and can create fast changing electric fields.  Power converters can have currents with high rates of change that create large magnetic fields.

EMC  presents a further design challenge for digital power.  The presence of sample and hold circuits in analogue to digital converters means that switching occurring during sampling can have large and unexpected effects on the control.  As a result digital control needs excellent EMC management.

The basics of EMC are obvious but the subtleties, details of what to do and that “how much is good enough” feel can take time to learn.  Training from experts can speed that learning and give good cost effective outcomes.

Follow ELMG

About Keith

Keith Armstrong is a well known author and expert in cost-effective EMC and safety management and design. He is a practicing EMC/Compliance engineer and Chairman of IEE/IET Working Group on EMC and Functional Safety. Keith is an articulate and lively presenter and received excellent reviews after his previous visits to New Zealand and Australia. He has an international reputation as an EMC engineer who is constantly seeking to improve EMC practices to save time and cost and improve competitiveness.

He is presenting EMC and Safety courses in Australia and New Zealand.  Course information and dates are available by clicking here.

About the courses

The great thing about the courses are that they are very practically focused and provide just enough theory.  Keith has great rules of thumb and design guides along with some great reference guides.  I know and like Keith and he teaches well. I have done his courses previously.

At ELMG Digital Power we use Keith’s courses as the basis for training for EMC.

The courses are a good investment for young and not so young engineers.

If you are not in New Zealand or Australia then please do not worry that you cannot attend.  Keith is based in the United Kingdon and runs similar courses worldwide.

Let us know if you need any further information by clicking here and we will put you in touch directly with Keith.

Follow ELMG

The training details are available here.